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Full text of "NightRider"

37*

hotel and tell Professor Ball.   He hated to look at Cordelia,
knowing what he knew.

The next morning Mr. Munn woke up very early. The
light was just beginning to come. He lay on his back, look-
ing up at the ceiling, and thought of the cold, anonymous
light unfolding, slowly, over the countryside, over the fields
and roads and hedges and the woods, that would be dark
longest, and over the roofs of the town, and in bedrooms like
this where people slept; but he was not asleep. He felt very
tired, but wakeful with a detachment and clarity of mind, as
when a man comes out of a fever.

At six o'clock Professor Ball came to his door and he got
up. Professor Ball said that he hadn't been able to sleep
either. They were the first people in the dining-room. They
ate without talking. When he had finished, Mr. Munn said
that he had to go down to the office a minute to leave a note
for his secretary, and would come back in time to go with
them to the courthouse. Professor Ball said that he would
go up and see if the girls were ready for breakfast.

Mr. Munn started to go out the back way of the hotel, to
take the short cut down the alley to his office, then changed
his mind. He wanted to get a newspaper. He got the news-
paper, glanced quickly at the headlines concerning the trial,
and with the paper under his arm, walked down the square
and turned to the, right toward his office. He met two men
whom he knew, and spoke to them. At the drugstore under
his office, a clerk was propping the front doors open, "It's
sure beginning to look tough," the clerk said, " for that fellow
MacDonald. I was saying just yesterday it looked like------"

"Do you think so?" Mr, Munn said, and turned up the
stairs to his office.

He unlocked the door to the office and entered. He leaned
over his desk and scrawled a few lines to the girl. Then he
raised the window so that the place could be airing out. Clear
sunlight now fell over the western side of the square. People,
almost a crowd, were beginning to congregate. He looked at